Take It Easy on Those Keyboards

Laptop computers have become an essential part of our daily lives in today’s world. Their portability and ease of use has transformed the way we live and work, and has helped maximize productivity and efficiency in many areas of our lives. They are an integral part of education and many small businesses even run their companies from their laptops. However there remain man question surrounding computer usage that we still do not know the answers.

When my mom got her first laptop I remember her dealing with some painful issues. She would come home and groan about how her hand hurts so much. She would say that her wrist would hurt after using her computer for a while. As time passed on the pain only got worse. Pintrest didn’t help. Upon my mother’s discovery of the website that is Pinterest she became quickly addicted. She would spend over two hours pinning and repinning and saving and linking and all things Pintrest every single night. This lead to even more complaints about how her wrist and fingers hurt. Naturally like any millennial I turned to the internet to learn more and naturally I learned things.

Evidence suggests that using laptops specifically can lead to intense strain on your fingers and wrists. This is strain that is called “repetitive strain injury” is due to the design of the smaller and flat keyboards as well as the trackpad that are both a staple of the modern-day laptop. “Repetitive strain injury” is caused by executing repetitive tasks, sustained or awkward positions, or a plethora of other actions. Using a laptop often entails doing repetitive hand and finger motions, such as hitting the space-bar over and over or pressing the backspace over and over. But fear not! There are many counter-measures to avoid over straining your hands or wrists. One such measure is to use a wireless keyboard, mouse or monitor. By strategically placing these components at your work or home you can be able to have correct posture that fights repetitive strain injury.


References:

http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/repetitive-strain-injury/Pages/Introduction.aspx